Fruit, vegetable, and legume intake, and cardiovascular disease and deaths

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A recent study has shown that higher total fruit, vegetable, and legume intake was inversely associated with major cardiovascular disease, myocardial infarction, cardiovascular mortality, non-cardiovascular mortality, and total mortality in the models adjusted for age, sex, and centre.

The prospective cohort study contained 135 335 individuals aged 35 to 70 years without cardiovascular disease from 613 communities in 18 low-income, middle-income, and high- income countries in seven geographical regions: North America and Europe, South America, the Middle East, south Asia, China, southeast Asia, and Africa.  

Overall, combined mean fruit, vegetable and legume intake was 3·91 servings per day. During a median 7·4 years of follow- up, 4784 major cardiovascular disease events, 1649 cardiovascular deaths, and 5796 total deaths were documented.

When examined separately, fruit intake was associated with lower risk of cardiovascular, non-cardiovascular, and total mortality, while legume intake was inversely associated with non-cardiovascular death and total mortality (in fully adjusted models). For vegetables, raw vegetable intake was strongly associated with a lower risk of total mortality, whereas cooked vegetable intake showed a modest benefit against mortality. 

Source: www.thelancet.com